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The Charleston Peninsula Study team hosted a virtual public meeting Oct. 5 to present details of the draft Feasibility Report/Environmental Impact Statement (FR/EIS). To view the full meeting, visit the study webpage by clicking the image above.
The restoration of the Crab Bank Seabird Sanctuary has begun. The project uses 660,000 cubic yards of compatible material to add 32 acres to the historic shorebird habitat. USACE asks all in the project vicinity to use caution, steer clear of all equipment and activity, and reduce speeds.
USACE encourages public feedback on the Charleston Peninsula Coastal Flood Risk Management Study draft Feasibility Report/Environmental Impact Statement (FR/EIS) during a 45-day public comment period from Sept. 10 - Oct. 25, 2021.
In partnership with South Carolina Ports Authority, the project sponsor, and countless others, today Charleston District is deepening the harbor to a historic depth of 52 feet, giving Charleston the deepest harbor on the east coast. The new depth — achieved by the end of next year — will also enable the world's largest ships safe passage into Charleston any time, at any tide.

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Welcome to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Charleston District's website. Here you'll find a wealth of information concerning our mission areas, how to conduct business with the Corps, locations, photos, projects and news. To help you locate items of interest, we've included a list below of the most frequently requested topics.
 

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St. Stephen Fish Lift

Photos

Lisa Metheney (second from left), Deputy District Engineer for Programs and Project Management for the U.S. Army Corps Of Engineers Charleston District, poses for a photo during a photoshoot for Charleston Women Magazine.  The photoshoot was for an upcoming Veterans Day edition of the magazine, which profiles a female leader from each branch of the military in Charleston.
Lisa Metheney, Deputy District Engineer for Programs and Project Management for the U.S. Army Corps Of Engineers Charleston District, poses for a photo during a photoshoot for Charleston Women Magazine.  The photoshoot was for an upcoming Veterans Day edition of the magazine, which profiles a female leader from each branch of the military in Charleston.
Dredged material from the Charleston harbor deepening project is added to Crab Bank, a 32-acre site of prime nesting habitat for many coastal birds.  Prior to 2017, nearly 4,000 nests could be found in a single summer along with thousands of offspring. The island also provided rest and nourishment for hundreds of migrating shorebirds. But wind and waves have taken a toll on this unique resource and Crab Bank is now a tiny fraction of its original size. In 2017, Hurricane Irma washed away most of the remaining high ground, removing any opportunity for nesting birds.
Dredged material from the Charleston harbor deepening project is added to Crab Bank, a 32-acre site of prime nesting habitat for many coastal birds, as a cargo ship passes in the background.  Prior to 2017, nearly 4,000 nests could be found in a single summer along with thousands of offspring. The island also provided rest and nourishment for hundreds of migrating shorebirds. But wind and waves have taken a toll on this unique resource and Crab Bank is now a tiny fraction of its original size. In 2017, Hurricane Irma washed away most of the remaining high ground, removing any opportunity for nesting birds.
In September, Virginia-based Norfolk Dredging Company began pumping operations that will place approximately 660,000 cubic yards of compatible material from the Charleston harbor deepening “Post 45” project to Crab Bank, a 32-acre site of prime nesting habitat for many coastal birds.  Prior to 2017, nearly 4,000 nests could be found in a single summer along with thousands of offspring. The island also provided rest and nourishment for hundreds of migrating shorebirds. But wind and waves have taken a toll on this unique resource and Crab Bank is now a tiny fraction of its original size. In 2017, Hurricane Irma washed away most of the remaining high ground, removing any opportunity for nesting birds.
A participant prepares to enter the fields during the 7th annual Warriors Dove Hunt in St. Stephen, SC. The Cooper River Rediversion Project is home to 90-acres of pristine dove hunting fields managed by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.
A hunter returns from the dove fields following a successful outing during the 7th annual Warriors Dove Hunt at the Cooper River Rediversion Project in St. Stephen, SC. The hunt is exclusively for U.S. military Wounded Warriors and veterans and is hosted by SCDNR and the USACE Charleston District.
Maurice Williams, Power Project Manager for the St. Stephen Powerhouse, explains to Lt. Col. Andrew Johannes, commander for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Charleston District, how the hydroelectric plant operates.  Johannes made his first visit to St. Stephen since taking command of the district in July.
Maurice Williams (right), Power Project Manager for the St. Stephen Powerhouse, explains to Lt. Col. Andrew Johannes, commander for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Charleston District, about new equipment that will be installed at the hydroelectric plant.  Johannes made his first visit to St. Stephen since taking command of the district in July.
Jesse Helton, a Natural Resources Program Specialist, explains to Lt. Col. Andrew Johannes, commander for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Charleston District, how the St. Stephen fish lock operates.  Johannes made his first visit to St. Stephen since taking command of the district in July.